OCA Home SECURE LOGIN NOTICE OF PRIVACY PRACTICES CONTACT US ABOUT OHHP
MyOHH LoginSearch:
   






Diagnostic Testing




backback Tests & Procedures

Vascular Ultrasound

An ultrasound procedure measures high-frequency sound waves (ultrasound waves) as they pass through the body and rebound off certain structures. The sound waves cause no discomfort as they enter the body from a hand-held transducer that a technician places on the patient’s skin. A conductive gel or lubricant jelly is placed on the skin to help the transducer conduct the waves through the skin. As the transducer is moved along the surface of the patient’s skin, ultrasound waves enter the body and bounce off the body’s internal structures. Images of tissues and organs are created from these reflections of the sound waves.

A carotid ultrasound is one example of a vascular ultrasound. During this procedure, the transducer is placed on the patient’s neck over the carotid artery. The technician slowly moves the transducer along the course of the artery. As blood cells move through the vessel, ultrasound signals are transmitted onto a graph, where they are recorded and analyzed. This type of procedure can also be conducted to evaluate other arteries and veins in the body, such as the aorta, the major vessel carrying blood away from the heart and to the lower abdomen, where it branches into the smaller arteries that supply the vessels of the lower extremities.